Oct 05, 2022  
2022 Catalog 
    
2022 Catalog

Course Descriptions


 

Other Courses

  
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    ENG 265 / WMS 265 Women’s Autobiography


    Prerequisite: ENG 102  or permission of instructor
    3 credits

    Traditionally, autobiography has been viewed as a direct and true reflection of a person’s life. This course is designed around current theories that question that view and posit, instead, autobiography as a construction of self. Through a focus on a diverse cross-section of 20th Century Womens’ Autobiographies, we will analyze how gender, sexuality, race, class, and location affect what is written and how it is written. We will also ask how are these women’s identities shaped by their placement in the text and in society? How do these women use their writing to modify or strengthen the ways that society has positioned them?

Accounting

  
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    ACC 113 Principles of Financial Accounting


    Prerequisites: Eligibility for MAT 136  and ENG 101  or ESL 152 
    3 credits

    Financial accounting theory and practice are oriented toward the corporate form of business organization. Accounting and business transactions are analyzed, recorded and summarized for the preparation of general purpose financial statements. Students not only learn the accounting process but also the use of accounting information as a basis for decision-making, and gain an understanding of accounting as the language of business.
  
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    ACC 117 Principles of Managerial Accounting


    Prerequisite: ACC 113  with a C or higher
    3 credits

    Managerial accounting is centered on the use of accounting information as a management tool for decision-making, performance evaluation, planning and controlling operations. The fundamental concepts of inventory valuation under job order and process costing methods, cost behavior patterns, cost volume profit analysis, variable costing, budgeting, transfer-pricing and activity-based costing are studied.
  
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    ACC 125 Accounting Computer Applications I


    Prerequisite: ACC 113  with a C or higher
    3 credits

    Students learn the basic operation of accounting information systems, basic procedures and controls used in processing business transactions, and prepare reports using a hands-on approach. The latest accounting software is used.
  
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    ACC 170 Forensic Accounting and Fraud Examination


    Prerequisite: ACC 113  with a C or higher
    3 credits

    This course is a study of the basic principles and skills of Forensic Accounting and Fraud Examination. Emphasis is placed on financial forensic, prevention, deterrence and detection of fraud.
  
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    ACC 241 Federal Income Taxes I


    Prerequisite: ACC 113  with a C or higher
    3 credits

    This course is designed to give the student a basic understanding of federal income taxes for individuals. A hands-on approach involving preparation of the latest tax forms is used. Emphasis is on the tax accounting concepts of the law. Topics covered include taxable income, exemptions, deductions, capital transactions, and determination of taxes to be paid.
  
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    ACC 242 Federal Income Taxes II


    Prerequisite: ACC 113  with a C or higher
    3 credits

    Students learn the basic understanding of federal income taxes for partnerships, LLCs and C and S corporations. Tax returns for each type of entity are prepared and taxation for the different types of entities is compared.
  
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    ACC 251 Fund Accounting


    Prerequisite: ACC 113  or permission of the accounting program coordinator
    3 credits

    This course is designed to help students develop a logical framework for understanding the accounting- related problems of not-for-profit organizations, including governmental units. The conceptual foundation provided will be beneficial to students who anticipate careers in the not-for-profit sector. Other business students can also benefit by knowing how to interpret the financial statements of not-for-profit entities.
  
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    ACC 271 Intermediate Accounting I


    Prerequisite: ACC 113  with a C or higher
    3 credits

    ACC 271 and ACC 272  emphasize theory and concepts and provide an in-depth study of principles, procedures and practices used in financial recording and reporting. This course focuses on the process of creating accounting standards, fundamental accounting concepts, revenue recognition, and the application of concepts to prepare the basic financial statements.
  
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    ACC 272 Intermediate Accounting II


    Prerequisite: ACC 271  with a C or higher
    3 credits

    This course is a continuation of ACC 271 . This course covers long-term assets, liabilities, stockholders equity, including earnings per share. The effects of the time value of money on assets and liabilities. ACC 272 introduces specialized topics such as accounting for income taxes, pensions, and leases. Basic concepts taught in Intermediate Accounting I are reinforced. Continuing emphasis on the concepts governing corporate financial reporting are reinforced. ACC 272 covers the principles and procedures applicable to accounting valuations for current and long-term investments, current and long-term liabilities, stockholders equity and revenue and expense recognition and measurement.
  
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    ACC 290 Cooperative Education Work Experience


    Prerequisites: ENG 101 , ACC 271 , matriculation and sophomore standing in the Business program, Minimum GPA 2.0, and approval of program coordinator
    3 credits

    This course combines a classroom seminar with on-the-job training. Students who meet program eligibility work at an approved Cooperative Education Work Experience Site and attend scheduled seminar on campus or online. The seminar covers the essentials of a learning plan for the workplace assignment, career development, and how to incorporate the classroom experience into the workplace. Students must satisfactorily complete the seminar, the final project, and the workplace assignment to receive credit. Faculty assign a final project designed to understand what knowledge the student has obtained from this work experience. 

Anthropology/Archaeology

  
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    ANT 105 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology


    Prerequisite: Eligibility for ENG 101 
    3 credits

    This cross-cultural, non-Western course introduces the student to cultural studies, an area within the discipline of anthropology. Under examination will be the beliefs, values, rituals, customs and material culture that inform and explain any societys world view. A variety of world cultures will be explored, including cultural responses to change in this age of globalization.
  
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    ANT 121 Introduction to Archaeology


    Prerequisite: Eligibility for ENG 101 
    3 credits

    This course provides an introduction to the tools, methods and theories used in archaeology as well as an overview of northeastern U.S. prehistory. Students receive pre-excavation training prior to their participation in the investigation of a local prehistoric archaeological site. The analysis of recovered materials and the interpretation of the site provide the basis for the writing of an archaeological site report.
  
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    ANT 131 World Prehistory


    Prerequisite: Eligibility for ENG 101  
    3 credits

    This course provides the foundation for understanding the human story, from fossil evidence of the earliest humans to the development of complex societies. It introduces some of the most important achievements of our human species before written history. From the Early Man discoveries in Africa to the appearance of modern peoples who created the Cave Paintings during the Upper Paleolithic and from the builders of Stonehenge to the great civilizations of the Near East, Egypt and Mesoamerica, this course surveys those cultural developments that are the legacy of all peoples everywhere. Not offered every semester.
  
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    ANT 211 Lifestyles and Outlooks


    Prerequisite: Eligibility for ENG 101  
    3 credits

    American culture has always been a patchwork of different realities. Once derived from Old World ethnic entities, todays proliferating subcultures are based as well on age, religious beliefs, occupation, class and ideology. From cults to street gangs, from bag ladies to urban terrorists, all represent particular views of life. The course explores each of these and also considers ways in which such groupings contribute to or alter the nature of American culture and strengthen or weaken the social bond. Not offered every year.
  
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    ANT 223 Advanced Techniques in Archaeology


    Prerequisite: ANT 121   
    4 credits

    Students will be trained to function in the field with some degree of independence through the participation in individual archaeological site survey research. In the laboratory, students will learn techniques for the analysis and interpretation of prehistoric artifacts, soils, floral and faunal remains. Three hours of class and field work. Three hours of laboratory to be arranged with the instructor. Not offered every semester.
  
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    ANT 229 Historical Archaeology


    Prerequisite: Eligibility for ENG 101  
    3 credits

    Not a field course, this study seeks to present, in a classroom setting, the methods used by researchers in investigating historic sites of the 18th and 19th centuries and to illustrate the kinds of questions which historical archaeology is uniquely qualified to answer. Topics include approaches to documentary research; building materials and architectural styles; field strategies; identifying archaeologically recovered materials such as ceramics, metal and glass; curating and the archaeological collection. The hands-on approach includes sessions with materials from a notable site in Fairfield County. Each student undertakes an independent research project focusing on a structure or site in his/her own community. Two field trips are planned. Not offered every year.
  
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    ANT 240 Indians of the Americas


    Prerequisite: Eligibility for ENG 101  
    3 credits

    This course explores the belief systems and rituals of Native American peoples, from the Arctic to the American Southwest. Traditional ways of First People such as the Eskimo, Sioux, Navajo and Iroquois are presented against a background of culture areas in North America. Current realities - political, economic and cultural - are also explored. As an ethnography course in culture study, the student has the opportunity to research a tribal group in Middle or South America. Not offered every semester.

Arabic

  
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    ARA 111 Elementary Arabic I


    Prerequisites: Eligibility for ENG 101  or permission of instructor
    4 credits

    This course introduces students to basic Arabic vocabulary and practical grammar with emphasis on speaking and listening. Students also read simple materials and write brief responses in Arabic. These language patterns and skills are taught within a cultural context and focus on practical applications to daily life. Native speakers of Arabic are not permitted to register for this course without the written permissions of the instructor before classes begin. Departmental Exit Examination is required. A minimum of one language laboratory hour per week is required.
  
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    ARA 112 Elementary Arabic II


    Prerequisites: ARA 111  at NCC or equivalent as determined by placement exam
    4 credits

    In this continuation of ARA 111 , students expand their vocabulary, learn more complex grammatical forms, read longer selections and write short paragraphs in Arabic. They continue to develop speaking skills in a cultural context. Departmental exit examination is required. A minimum of one language laboratory hour per week is required. Native speakers of Arabic are not permitted to register for this course without the written permission of the instructor before classes begin.

Architectural Engineering Technology

  
  
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    ARC 105 Architectural Visualization


    Co-requisites: CAD 114  or AutoCAD knowledge
    4 credits

    This course is an introduction to basic freehand and hard line architectural drawings. Work includes drafting techniques, perspective drawing, sketching and color. Basic presentation tools and techniques will be introduced. Drawing will be studied as a tool of visualization. The impact of light, shadow and composition on architectural drawing will be explored. One hour lecture, five hours studio.
  
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    ARC 106 Building Technology


    4 credits

    The study of materials, their origin, manufacture, use, limitations and application in construction. Areas of concentration include building systems, foundations, wood, heavy timber and light frame construction, masonry, steel, concrete, sitecast and precast concrete framing systems, roofing, glass and glazing, cladding and finishes.
  
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    ARC 115 Architectural Fundamentals


    Prerequisite: ARC 105  
    4 credits

    Principles of architectural design are studied. The goal of this studio sequence is to expand and apply knowledge acquired in ARC 105  Architectural Visualization into a series of design experiences at the residential scale. The results are critiqued in classroom. Concept of space is introduced. Design problems are given, solved and discussed. The impact of structure on design is also addressed. Two hours lecture, four hours studio.
  
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    ARC 201 Architectural Design I


    Prerequisite: ARC 115   
    4 credits

    Students develop basic skills of project design, including site analysis and site design. The main focus of the course is the design of a multifamily dwelling project on an assigned site. Drawings are presented to a professional jury for critique. Two hours lecture, four hours studio.
  
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    ARC 202 Architectural Design II

    formerly ARC 204
    Prerequisite: ARC 201  
    4 credits

    Further development of the student’s skills through the design of a commercial and public building on an assigned site. Drawings and models will be critiqued by a professional jury. Two hours lecture, four hours studio.
  
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    ARC 215 Construction Documents


    4 credits

    Introduction to the architect’s practice. Study problems involved in the personal, ethical, and legal relationships between architect, engineer, owner, and contractor. The organization and day-to-day problems of the architect’s office are reviewed. Study building codes, laws, zoning regulations, legal AIA documents, CSI format specifications and their applications. Introduction to working drawings and preparation of cost estimating bids. Two hours lecture, four hours studio.
  
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    ARC 229 Structures


    Prerequisite: PHY 121   or permission of instructor
    3 credits

    Investigation of principles of structural mechanics. Study of compressive, tensile, shear and bending stresses; strain due to axial loads; beam loading; column and beam action in determinate structures; beam and column design in steel and wood. Two hours lecture, four hours studio.
  
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    ARC 240 Environmental Systems


    3 credits

    This course imparts a knowledge of the interior environment of structures large and small and the interrelationship of energy, climate, site and architectural design. Conservation of non-renewable energy sources is an intrinsic theme. A study of the design factors in heating, cooling, plumbing, fire protection and electrical systems is included. Two hours lecture, two hours studio.
  
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    ARC 290 Portfolio Preparation I


    Prerequisites: Second-year status, matriculation in an Architecture or Interior Design curriculum and permission of the Architecture Program Coordinator
    1 credit

    Under the supervision of the Architecture Program Advisor, students will prepare a portfolio demonstrating their skills in a variety of media.  While the emphasis of this portfolio will vary according to individual needs, it will include representative samples of work from core Architecture and Interior Design courses.  This portfolio can be used for transfer purposes and for employment applications.
  
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    ARC 293 Architecture Internship


    Prerequisites: Second-year status and permission of the Architectural Engineering/Construction Technology coordinator.
    3 credits

    This course provides practical experience through an internship in a supervised setting related to architectural engineering and construction technology. Through this learning occurrence, students will be able to pursue a building industries profession, or have the skills necessary for; a private office, provide job supervision, material supplier or vendor cost estimation scheduling, etc. Such an opportunity can be within a public or private setting related to architecture or construction management. To participate, permission of the Coordinator - Architectural Engineering/Construction Technology is required.
  
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    ARC 296 Cooperative Education Work Experience


    Prerequisites: ENG 101 , matriculation and sophomore standing in the Architectural Engineering Technology program. Minimum GPA 2.0. Approval of the program coordinator required.
    3 credits

    This course combines a classroom seminar with on-the-job learning. Students who meet program eligibility work at an approved Cooperative Education Site and attend a regularly scheduled seminar on campus. The seminar covers the establishment of learning goals for the work assignment, career development and work-related problem-solving. Students must satisfactorily complete the seminar, the final project, and the work assignment to receive credit. Faculty assign a final project designed to elicit on-the-job learning specific to architecture.

Art

  
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    ART ELE  Art Elective


    Art Elective.
  
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    ART 100 Art Appreciation


    Prerequisite: Eligibility for ENG 101  or permission of Art coordinator
    3 credits

    Students are introduced to the concepts and principles of art including line, shape, form, color and space. They study selected works and complete basic exercises in a variety of art media in order to understand and develop an appreciation for the creative process. A paper based on direct observation of works in a major museum is required. No previous art training is necessary.
  
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    ART 101 Art History I: Prehistoric to the 14th Century


    Prerequisite: ENG 101  or permission of Art coordinator
    3 credits

    This course offers a survey of Western art from prehistoric times to the 14th century. A paper based on direct observation of art works in a major art museum is required.
  
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    ART 102 Art History II: Modern Art


    Prerequisite: ENG 101  or permission of Art coordinator
    3 credits

    This course provides a survey of art from the French Revolution to the mid-twentieth century. A paper based on direct observation of works in a major museum is required.
  
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    ART 105 Architecture of the World


    3 credits

    The critical influence of social, religious, historical and technological forces on the characteristic features of architecture are stressed by studying the various architectural styles. Course covers architectural milestones from ancient to modern on all of the continents.
  
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    ART 109 Color Theory


    Prerequisites: Eligibility for ENG 101  or permission of Art coordinator
    3 credits

    This course is an examination of the action and interaction of color and the study of the visual and psychological factors related to color perception. Students are responsible for purchasing supplies. Two hours lecture, three hours studio.
  
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    ART 111 Drawing I


    Prerequisite: Eligibility for ENG 101  or ESL 152  or permission of Art coordinator
    3 credits

    Drawing fundamentals are stressed. Students work with a variety of media, drawing from a variety of subject matter to develop a comprehension and visual articulation of form. A term project is required. Students are responsible for purchasing supplies. One hour lecture, five hours studio.
  
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    ART 112 Drawing II


    Prerequisite: ART 111  or permission of Art coordinator
    3 credits

    This course builds on skills learned in Drawing I. Creative use of media, accuracy of seeing and further development of drawing fundamentals are stressed. Students are responsible for purchasing supplies. One hour lecture, five hours studio.
  
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    ART 113 Figure Drawing I


    Prerequisite: ART 111  or permission of Art coordinator
    3 credits

    This course focuses on the fundamental skills needed to competently draw the figure. Students work with a variety of media, drawing from life and from other subject matter. A term project is required which demands time outside of class. Students are responsible for purchasing supplies. One hour lecture, five hours studio.
  
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    ART 121 Two-Dimensional Design


    Prerequisites: Eligibility for ENG 096  or ESL 152  or permission of Art coordinator
    3 credits

    This introductory course focuses on the basic elements and principles of design such as line, texture, space, balance, unity and scale. Students are responsible for purchasing supplies. Two hours lecture, three hours studio.
  
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    ART 131 Sculpture I


    Prerequisite: Eligibility for ENG 101  or permission of Art coordinator
    3 credits

    Through studio experience, lectures and class discussions, students learn about the basic design concepts, techniques, materials and tools relevant to creating three-dimensional sculptural forms. A term project is required. Students are responsible for purchasing supplies. One hour lecture, five hours studio.
  
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    ART 141 Photography I


    Prerequisite: Eligibility for ENG 101  or permission of Art coordinator
    3 credits

    In this basic course, the fundamental processes of black and white photography are explored. Camera use, metering, film developing and presentation are covered. A paper based on direct observation of works in a major museum is required. Students are required to furnish a manually adjustable camera and other photographic supplies as needed. Two hours lecture, three hours studio.
  
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    ART 151 Painting I


    Prerequisite: ART 111  or permission of Art coordinator
    3 credits

    This course offers an understanding of the techniques, materials and creative practice of water-based media, focusing on the use of acrylics. Students are responsible for purchasing supplies. One hour lecture, five hours studio.
  
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    ART 152 Painting II


    Prerequisite: ART 151  or permission of Art coordinator
    3 credits

    This intermediate course builds upon the painting fundamentals learned in ART 151 Painting I . Through structured studio experiences, lectures, and individual critiques intermediate painting techniques, and principles will be introduced. Projects will be assigned that allow for the development of personal expression within the painting medium. Students are responsible for purchasing supplies. One hour lecture, five hours studio.
  
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    ART 161 Ceramics I


    Prerequisites: Eligibility for ENG 096  or ESL 152  or permission of Art coordinator
    3 credits

    Students learn the fundamental concepts, techniques and applications of ceramics including various construction, glazing and firing techniques. Concepts of three-dimensional design, color and surface decoration are explored. Students are responsible for purchasing supplies. One hour lecture, five hours studio.
  
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    ART 167 Printmaking I


    Prerequisites: ART 111  or ART 121  or permission of Art coordinator
    3 credits

    This studio course introduces basic printmaking processes and equipment with equal emphasis on concepts and techniques. Students are introduced to a variety of print media and methods, such as monotype, relief, intaglio and lithography, and various approaches to making and printing plates in each medium. Students are expected to develop an understanding of the medium and to learn good studio habits; safe and responsive handling of tools, materials and grounds, and the knowledge required for basic manipulation of the processes used in the production of a printed image. One hour lecture, five hours studio.
  
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    ART 189 Animation Fundamentals


    Prerequisites: ART 111 or permission of Studio Arts Coordinator
    3 credits

    This course is an introduction to the principles of animation. Traditional and contemporary technology will be used to complete exercises and projects. Students are responsible for purchasing supplies. Two hours lecture, three hours studio.
  
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    ART 205 History of Photography


    Prerequisite: Eligibility for ENG 101  or permission of Art coordinator
    3 credits

    A survey of the history and development of photography from the beginning to the present. Major trends, styles, and photographers are covered. The course will also include political, social and scientific influences on photography and the role of photography in everyday life. A paper based on direct observation of photographs in a major museum and oral report on an established photographer are required.
  
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    ART 207 History of Graphic Design


    Prerequisite: ENG 101  or permission of the Graphic Design coordinator
    3 credits

    The lecture course focuses on a survey of graphic design from the invention of writing to the present. It locates graphic design within the history of art and articulates its aesthetic import and contributions to cultural development. It examines links between socio-political phenomena and development of advertising and propaganda art, and introduces the student to the works of leading graphic designers, art directors, illustrators, photographers, and typographers. Major styles will be analyzed and compared, and influences identified.
  
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    ART 250 Digital Photography


    Prerequisites: Eligibility for ENG 101  or permission of Art coordinator
    3 credits

    In this introductory course, students will learn the fundamentals of photography using digital media. Students are introduced to camera use, exposure controls, and post-processing. Assignments explore visual and creative problem solving. There will be lectures, critiques, and discussion groups at regular intervals. Students are responsible for providing a camera, be it mobile phone or traditional camera, and other supplies as needed. Two hours lecture, three hours studio. Two hours lecture, three hours studio.
  
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    ART 280 Advanced Digital Photography


    Prerequisite: ART 250 , or both ART 141  and GRA 231 , or by permission of Art coordinator
    3 credits

    In this course students will explore advanced digital imaging techniques, including an introduction to Camera RAW. Assignments explore visual and creative problem solving. There will be lectures and critiques at regular intervals. A paper based on direct observation of works in a major museum is required. Students are responsible for providing a manually adjustable digital camera, paper, storage devices, and other supplies as needed. Two hours lecture, three hours studio.
  
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    ART 290 Portfolio Preparation I


    Prerequisites: Second-year status, matriculation in an Art curriculum and permission of the Art coordinator
    1 credit

    Under the supervision of an art advisor, students prepare a portfolio demonstrating their skills in a variety of media. While the emphasis of this portfolio will vary according to individual needs, it includes representative samples of work from the core art courses of the students curriculum. This portfolio may be used for transfer to a four-year art program.
  
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    ART 292 Cooperative Education Work Experience


    Prerequisites: ENG 101 , second-year status, minimum 2.0 GPA, and permission of Art coordinator
    3 credits

    This course combines a classroom seminar with on-the-job learning in the visual arts and graphic design. Students work at an approved Cooperative Education Work Experience site and attend a regularly scheduled seminar on campus. Workplace experience allows students to practice skills taught in class while learning new skills relevant to their area of specialization. The seminar assists in the establishment of learning goals for the work assignment, career development and work-related problem solving. A final project is assigned to document the learning objectives. Students must complete the seminar, final project, and work assignments to receive credit. 
  
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    ART 293 Art Internship


    Prerequisites: Second-year status and permission of the Studio Arts Coordinator.
    3 credits

    This course provides practical experience through an internship in a supervised setting related to a visual arts and/or design profession such as an art museum, gallery, art center or artist studio.  Such an opportunity can be within a public or private setting related to the visual arts.  Permission of the Coordinator, Studio Arts is required.
  

Astronomy

  
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    AST 101 Principles of Astronomy


    Prerequisite: Eligibility for both ENG 101  and MAT 136  
    3 credits

    The laws of nature that account for the earth and the heavenly bodies and their characteristics are studied.  The course is designed to develop the appreciation of the beauty and order of the universe, and to use some basic mathematics to calculate how it works as well. Two hours of class; two hours of laboratory per week.

Biology

  
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    BIO 103 / WMS 103 Women’s Health


    Prerequisite: Eligibility for ENG 101  
    3 credits

    This course focuses on the biology of women. Specific topics include reproduction, birth control, genetics, gender determination, sexual orientation, sex change, conception to birth, women’s health and body systems, aging, women in science and scientific research.
  
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    BIO 105 Introduction to Biology


    Prerequisites: Eligibility for ENG 101  and eligibility for MAT 136  
    4 credits

    A course for non-science majors. Representative topics include the chemistry of life, genetics, structure and function of cells and tissues, and selected plant and animal systems. Labs may involve dissection of plant and animal specimens, microscope work, and elementary biochemistry experiments. Three hours of class work, three hours of lab per week.
  
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    BIO 110 Principles of the Human Body


    Prerequisite: Eligibility for or completion of ENG 101  
    3 credits

    This course is a non-majors course designed to introduce students to basic principles required to support human life. The cellular nature of life and organization and function of organs and organ systems is emphasized. In addition to the textbook, students use a variety of resources from traditional print to electronic media to acquire and evaluate relevant scientific content. Selected body systems and disease states are discussed. This course cannot be used as the prerequisite for BIO 211 , BIO 235 , or VET 201 .
  
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    BIO 111 Introduction to Nutrition


    Prerequisite: Eligibility for ENG 096  
    3 credits

    This course is designed to help students gain knowledge of the basic elements of nutrition. The nutrients in carbohydrates, proteins, lipids, vitamins, minerals and water are emphasized. Food safety, weight control, nutritional needs of different age groups, and the importance of good nutrition for health are also discussed. No laboratory.
  
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    BIO 112 Applied Nutrition


    Prerequisite: Eligibility for ENG 101  and MAT 094  
    Pre- or Co-requisite: any HSP course
    3 credits

    An introduction to the study of nutrition as it relates to the establishment and promotion of wellness in everyday life. This course focuses on an understanding of basic principles and concepts of nutrition with applications and examples specifically for the hospitality industry. Required for all Hospitality Management and Culinary Arts students. This course can only fulfill a science requirement for Hospitality Management and Culinary Arts students. Open to Hospitality Management and Culinary Arts students only.
  
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    BIO 115 Human Biology


    Prerequisites: Eligibility for ENG 101  
    4 credits

    This non-majors course introduces students to the basic principles required to support human life.  The cellular nature of life and organization and function of organs and organ systems is emphasized. Selected body systems and disease states are discussed.  Laboratory involves hands on activities and dissections to reinforce course concepts.  
  
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    BIO 121 General Biology I


    Prerequisites: Eligibility for ENG 101 , high school biology recommended
    4 credits

    This course offers a comprehensive study of fundamental biological concepts. The nature of scientific inquiry, water and carbon chemistry, cell structure and function, metabolism, photosynthesis, genetics and evolution are studied. Lab may include dissection of animal species. Three hours of class work; three hours of laboratory per week. Recommended for science majors.
  
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    BIO 122 General Biology II


    Prerequisite: BIO 121  
    4 credits

    As a continuation of BIO 121 , this course deals with the diversity of the living world, structure, function, ecological relationships and phylogeny of plants and animals. Lab includes the study of microscope slides and preserved specimens. Representative invertebrates and vertebrates will be dissected. Three hours of class work, three hours of laboratory per week.
  
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    BIO 173 General Ecology


    Prerequisites: BIO 105 , BIO 121 , or BIO 122  and MAT 136 , and eligibility for ENG 101 ; or permission of instructor
    4 credits

    This course is a one-semester introduction to ecological principles focusing on the factors that influence the distribution and abundance of organisms.  This course includes a survey of the interactions of organisms with each other and with the physical environment.  Systems will be examined at the individual, population, community and ecosystem levels.  Each ecological level will be studied in the context of evolutionary history and biodiversity.  At the end of the term, we will reflect on man’s influence on nature and conservation.  This course is designed for both science and non-science majors. 
  
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    BIO 180 Principals of Environmental Science


    Prerequisite: Eligibility for ENG 101  
    3 credits

    This course is an introduction to environmental studies. It includes the study of ecology which describes the relationships that exist between all parts of our environment, both living and nonliving. The course then focuses on environmental science which studies the impact of human intervention on our environment and addresses the problems posed and their possible solutions. This course fulfills the IDS requirement.
  
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    BIO 181 Environmental Science


    Prerequisite: Eligibility for ENG 101 
    4 credits

    This course is an introduction to environmental studies. It includes the study of ecology which describes the relationships that exist between all parts of our environment, both living and nonliving. The course then focuses on environmental science which studies the impact of human intervention on our environment and addresses the problems posed and their possible solutions. Environmental science is an interdisciplinary study that encompasses many other sciences and subjects such as biology, agriculture, chemistry, geology, politics, economics, ethics, sociology, public relations and many more. The course consists of lecture and lab. The lab component involves both laboratory and field activities. This course fulfills the IDS requirement.
  
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    BIO 211 Anatomy and Physiology I


    Prerequisites: Eligibility for ENG 101 ; BIO 105  (C or higher) and/or CHE 111  (C or higher) and/or successful completion (B or higher) of high school Chemistry within the last two years; or a passing grade on a Biology or Chemistry challenge exam; or permission of the Science department head.
    4 credits

    This is the first half of a two-semester course which studies the fundamental concepts of human anatomy and physiology. It covers body organization: integumentary, skeletal, muscular, nervous system and the special senses. Lab includes the study of microscopic slides, models and human bones and the dissection of appropriate organs and animal specimens. Three hours of class work, three hours of laboratory per week.
  
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    BIO 212 Anatomy and Physiology II


    Prerequisite: BIO 211  (C+ or higher) or permission of Science Department Chair
    4 credits

    This course is a continuation of BIO 211 . It covers endocrine, cardiovascular, lymphatic, immune, respiratory, digestive, urinary and reproductive systems. Lab includes the study of microscopic slides, models and the dissection of appropriate organs and animal specimens. Three hours of class work; three hours of laboratory per week.
  
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    BIO 235 Microbiology


    Prerequisites: Eligibility for ENG 101 , one semester of college work in both Biology and Chemistry or BIO 211  or VET 201  
    4 credits

    This course is an introduction to Microbiology. Topics include microbial morphology, metabolism, genetics, growth and control, infection, immunity and human pathogens. Laboratory work emphasizes bacterial staining techniques, culturing isolation and biochemical reactions. Three hours of class work; three hours of laboratory per week.
  
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    BIO 272 Marine Ecology


    Prerequisites: Any 100-level lab science or high school equivalent; eligibility for ENG 101  
    4 credits

    This course is designed to stimulate and advance knowledge of marine environments. It covers geological and chemical factors, classification of marine organisms and the ecology of estuaries, salt marshes, sandy beaches and rocky shores. It also includes animal behavior and how human populations along the shore impact on marine environments. Field trips to facilities such as the Maritime Aquarium, the R.V. Oceanic, and coastal environments give students firsthand knowledge Long Island Sound. Three hours of class work, three hours of laboratory per week. Not offered every year.
  
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    BIO 299 Honors Biology Research


    Prerequisite: BIO 121  and BIO 122  with a grade of B or higher, an interview with the faculty advisor, and departmental approval are required prior to signing up for this course.
    3 credits

    This course includes advanced research participation and laboratory work in various branches of biology. A seminar and final research report are required. This course involves a hands on research experience. The research will emphasize the development of independent scientific thought and practice, experimental design, use of the literature, and scientific speaking and writing. Six hours of laboratory per week; six hours of library research per week.

Business

  
  
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    BBG 101 Introduction to Business


    Prerequisite: Eligibility for ENG 096  
    3 credits

    As a platform for other business courses, this introductory course places business in perspective by surveying it in a contemporary manner and by offering students a solid foundation in the various disciplines of business. It provides a conceptual understanding of our capitalistic society, accounting management, human resources, marketing, finance and controls.
  
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    BBG 114 Business Application Software


    Prerequisite: Eligibility for ENG 101  
    4 credits

    This course provides hands-on, practical experience using computers for business. It begins with an introduction to computing fundamentals of hardware, operating system software and managing files. Heavy emphasis is placed on Excel. Considerable time is also spent on Word and PowerPoint and there is a brief introduction to Access. Students who successfully complete this course can state proficiency using Excel, Word and PowerPoint on their resumes. This course is recommended for anyone planning to transfer to a four-year institution as a Business major or planning to seek employment in an office environment. Note: This course uses the PC version of the Microsoft Office Suite. The Mac version is significantly different. Students with Macs must do their homework and studies on campus, where computers are available, or find other alternatives.
  
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    BBG 210 Business Communication


    Prerequisite: ENG 101  with a C or higher
    3 credits

    Students produce clear and well-organized communications (including business letters, reports, memos, speeches, graphs and charts) for technical, professional, business and occupational fields. Guidelines for improving speaking, reading and listening skills are covered. Small group, Diversity and globalization communication is also discussed. A portfolio of all class projects is submitted for evaluation periodically throughout the semester. A final oral and written business presentation is completed by all students.
  
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    BBG 231 Business Law I


    3 credits

    A knowledge and understanding of fundamental legal principles and their applications to business transactions and to individual rights and obligations are provided. The laws of contracts and agency are examined as the basic laws applying to business ethics as defined by government regulations and business torts and crimes are examined.
  
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    BBG 232 Business Law II


    Prerequisite: BBG 231 
    3 credits

    This course reviews current developments concerning the Uniform Commercial Code as to proprietary interests, bailments, sales-business responsibilities, torts-product liability, warranties, and commercial paper. Employment law, corporations and other business entities are examined.
  
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    BBG 240 Business Ethics


    Prerequisite: BMG 202  and ENG 101 
    3 credits

    This course will provide an introduction to ethical decision making in business. There will be an examination of individual, organizational and macro level issues in business ethics. The course is designed to assist the student as a potential business person to make informed and ethical decisions on a daily basis, rather than to determine correct ethical action. Both descriptive and normative models of unethical and ethical decision making in the business community will be analyzed to accomplish this objective. Dilemmas, real life situations and actual case studies will provide an opportunity for the student to utilize the concepts presented in the assignments and to resolve ethical issues. Both critical thinking and informed decision making will be emphasized.
  
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    BBG 295 Cooperative Education Work Experience


    Prerequisites: ENG 101 ; matriculation and sophomore standing in the Business program; Minimum GPA 2.0 and approval of program coordinator
    3 credits

    This course combines a classroom seminar with on-the-job learning. Students who meet program eligibility work at an approved Cooperative Education Work Experience Site and attend a regularly scheduled seminar on campus. The seminar covers the establishment of learning goals for the work assignment, career development and work-related problem solving. Students must satisfactorily complete the seminar, the final project, and the work assignment to receive credit. Faculty assign a final project designed to elicit on-the-job learning specific to business.

Business Entrepreneurship

  
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    BES 218 Entrepreneurship


    Prerequisite: Eligibility for ENG 101  
    3 credits

    This course is designed for students who have an interest in the planning and start-up of new business ventures, whether as independent enterprises or as new units of larger organizations. It is not concerned with management of companies once they are already in operation. The course covers external factors that influence entrepreneurial activity in our society, entrepreneurial characteristics, entrepreneurship as a systematic discipline, innovation vs. traditional practices, evaluation and preparation of a business plan, financing a new venture and management strategies during the initial start-up phase.

Business Finance

  
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    BFN 125 Principles of Banking


    Prerequisite: ENG 101 , MAT 136 
    3 credits

    The course develops skills to master established management principles for banks including business and consumer credit policy. Addressed are complex issues (all with a global dimension) of risk, regulation, technology and competition with insurance and investment companies. Asset/ liability management (including international markets), performance evaluation and regulation of financial services are covered.
  
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    BFN 201 Principles of Finance


    Prerequisite: Eligibility for MAT 136  and ENG 101 
    3 credits

    This course covers the traditional managerial and economic approaches to the principles of finance. The course is organized around the following major topics: the functions of financial management, financial analysis and planning, working capital, time value of money and interest rates, capital budgeting process and long-term financing.
  
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    BFN 203 Investment Principles


    Prerequisite: Eligibility for MAT 136  and ENG 101 
    3 credits

    The course serves as an introduction to evaluating common stocks, bonds, warrants, convertibles, options and other investment vehicles. Emphasis will be placed on techniques of financial analysis and portfolio selection. Students will participate in an investment simulation to provide lifelike experience in portfolio management.

Business Management

  
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    BMG 202 Principles of Management


    Prerequisite: Eligibility for ENG 101 
    3 credits

    Focusing on management theory and science and how they apply to managerial practices, this course provides a comprehensive review of the management decision-making process and how it centers around the various functions of management. Case analyses help students to understand how to consider using different approaches to solve management issues.
  
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    BMG 210 Organizational Behavior


    Prerequisite: BMG 202 
    3 credits

    This course presents an understanding of the structure and dynamics of the business organization. It outlines the behavior relationships of the individual, the group, and the organizational system. The course focuses on how those interrelationships affect, contribute to, and form a culture, and how that culture lends itself to performance and effectiveness of the enterprise.
  
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    BMG 220 Human Resources Management


    Prerequisite: Eligibility for ENG 101 
    3 credits

    In this analysis of the human factor in business, students examine methods of identifying, selecting, training and maintaining a force of employees; methods of payment and motivations; methods of promoting the welfare and safety of employees, and methods of maintaining harmonious working relations.

Business Marketing

  
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    BMK 106 Principles of Selling


    Prerequisite: Eligibility for ENG 101 
    3 credits

    This course introduces students to the processes involved in effective selling. Emphasis is placed on the principles and methods of selling as well as an examination of the critical factors affecting the organizational and individual selling relationship. Students are expected to prepare and present sales proposals.
  
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    BMK 201 Principles of Marketing


    Prerequisite: Eligibility for ENG 101 
    3 credits

    This course analyzes the marketing mix (product, price, distribution and promotion) from the managers point of view, with an emphasis on strategic decision-making. Students analyze real-world marketing issues and study factors impacting marketing decisions. Additional topics include: market research, ethics and global marketing.
  
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    BMK 241 Principles of Advertising


    Prerequisite: Eligibility for ENG 101 
    3 credits

    This course examines the impact and role of advertising in marketing, business and society. Emphasis is placed on the strategic use of major media and the creative aspects (art and copy) of an advertising campaign. Within a defined set of parameters, students are expected to form an advertising agency and develop a comprehensive marketing and advertising campaign for a product or service of their choice.

Chemistry

  
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    CHE 111 Concepts of Chemistry


    Prerequisite: MAT 136  and eligibility for ENG 101  
    4 credits

    This course includes a brief but comprehensive survey of chemistry. Topics include atomic structure, chemical bonding, stoichiometry, periodic table, properties of matter, solutions, acids, bases, salts, gas laws and organic compounds. Recommended as prerequisite for CHE 112 . Three hours of class work; three hours of laboratory per week.
  
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    CHE 121 General Chemistry I


    Prerequisite: Eligibility for ENG 101 ; MAT 136 ; high school Chemistry within the past four years or CHE 111  
    4 credits

    The course is designed to provide a basis for more advanced work in science, the general approach being theoretical and mathematical. Descriptive material is used in illustration. Some of the topics include atomic structure, formulas and equation calculations, periodicity, bonding and states of matter. This is the first half of a two-semester sequence. Three hours of class work, three hours of laboratory per week.
  
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    CHE 122 General Chemistry II


    Prerequisite: CHE 121 ; MAT 172  
    4 credits

    This course is a continuation of CHE 121 . The topics include: equilibria, kinetics, solubility, acids and bases, complex ions, electrochemistry, nuclear chemistry and organic chemistry. Calculations will be stressed. Laboratory work illustrates principles while dealing with quantitative interpretation of data. Three hours of class work; three hours of laboratory per week.
  
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    CHE 211 Organic Chemistry I


    Prerequisite: CHE 122  
    4 credits

    Designed for science, engineering and premedical majors. Topics include nomenclature, structure, properties, synthesis and reaction mechanisms of different classes of organic compounds. Laboratory work involves an introduction to current micro scale organic techniques and the preparation and properties of representative compounds. Fulfills open, liberal arts and, with CHE 212 , laboratory science electives. Three hours of class work; three hours of laboratory per week.
  
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    CHE 212 Organic Chemistry II


    Prerequisite: CHE 211  
    4 credits

    Sequel to CHE 211  Organic Chemistry I. Topics include: further discussions of functional group transformations in the light of their mechanisms and their applications to longer and more complex organic synthesis sequences. Important classes of biomolecules including amino acids, sugars and natural products are introduced. Laboratory work involves practical applications of the presented topics. Fulfills open, liberal arts, and, with CHE 211 , laboratory science electives. Three hours of class work; three hours of laboratory per week.
  
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    CHE 260 Honors Chemistry Research


    Prerequisite: CHE 121  and CHE 122  with a grade of B or higher, an interview with the faculty advisor and departmental approval are required prior to signing up for this course.
    3 credits

    This course includes advanced research participation and laboratory work in various branches of chemistry. A seminar and final research report are required. This course involves a hands on research experience. The research will emphasize the development of independent scientific thought and practice, experimental design, use of the literature, and scientific speaking and writing. Six hours of laboratory per week; six hours of library research per week.

Chinese

  
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    CHI 111 Elementary Chinese I


    Prerequisite: Eligibility for ENG 101  or permission of instructor
    4 credits

    This course introduces students to basic Chinese vocabulary and grammar with emphasis on speaking and listening. Students will also read simple materials and write brief responses in Chinese. The language patterns and skills are taught within a cultural context and focus on practical applications to daily life. Departmental Exit Examination is required. A minimum of one language laboratory hour per week is required. Native speakers of Chinese are not permitted to register for this course without the written permission of the instructor before classes begin.
  
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    CHI 112 Elementary Chinese II


    Prerequisites: CHI 111  at NCC or equivalent as determined by placement exam
    4 credits

    In this continuation of CHI 111 , students expand their vocabulary, learn more complex grammatical forms, read longer selections and write short paragraphs in Chinese. They continue to develop speaking skills in a cultural context. Departmental exit examination is required. A minimum of one language laboratory hour per week is required. Native speakers of Chinese are not permitted to register for this course without the written permission of the instructor before classes begin.
 

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